Scrub Jay

Stellar Jay

Scrub Jay

Stellar Jay

It's ok if you want to show off and call them by their individual names, but for most of us they are all Blue Jay. Toronto, Canada calls their baseball team Blue Jay and Johns Hopkins University's mascot is Blue Jay. If a great big city and a university full of very smart people call them Blue Jay, who are we to argue?

In ancient times, Blue Jay was known as a lively and mischievous trickster, however some Native American symbolism associates him with purity, clarity, and vision. African American tradition includes a story of Blue Jay regularly visiting Hades. There is often something slightly sinister associated with Blue Jay, but we know him pretty well and think that is primarily because he seems to be of overly serious demeanor and has a very loud mouth. His squawk of alarm is definitely raucous, but his lexicon includes softer sounds as well. In fact, Blue Jay has a huge vocabulary and is an excellent mimic. He can do Hawk so well that other birds will immediately flee the scene. We are not sure whether Blue Jay does this for fun or to scare competition away from a food source - maybe both.

Blue Jay mates for life, is very brave, highly intelligent, extremely curious, and is an admirable parent. An old wives' tale holds that Blue Jay robs other bird's nests, but ornithologists tell us that is more rare than commonly thought. We have personally seen Blue Jay feed young birds that are not blue jays. Blue Jay will aggressively defend against Raven and Hawk attacking not only their own nest, but also the nest of others. Mostly, Blue Jay eats grains, nuts, acorns, seeds, berries, and insects. If he occasionally eats an egg don't hold it against him too much. Remember that we do too.

Blue is Beautiful.