Osprey

Osprey

Osprey

Osprey

Greek mythology has a king of Athens turning into Osprey to discipline a wayward daughter.  Osprey's scientific name is taken from the name of this mythical king - Pandion. (Well-educated people with too much time on their hands argue about the suitability of the name because Osprey does not eat swallows.)  More than three centuries before Christ was born, Aristotle mentions Osprey in his writings.  Pliny the Elder included Osprey in his compendium of natural knowledge in the first century of the Christian era.  In South America, Osprey bones are used as talismans for hunters.   Shakespeare uses Osprey to represent inevitability in one of his plays.  William Butler Yeats uses Osprey to represent sorrow in one of his poems.  The Seattle Sea Hawks are the most famous of the many sports teams that use Osprey for their symbol.  For the U.S. Marines, Osprey is a tilt-rotor military combat aircraft.  

We agree with Shakespeare.
Osprey is so good at what he does that he implies inevitability.

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