Foxglove, Digitalis pursuers, is a beautiful herbaceous perennial that grows in some of the wooded areas here on the Ranch. We have been told that it is not native to this area, but we do not know of anyone who is actively cultivating it at the present time. The plants that we see appear to be wild now, whatever their original introduction to the Ranch. A lot has been written about how this plant got it's name. We certainly do not know which one of the many stories might be closest to the truth, but whoever originally named it lived a long, long time ago. The name almost certainly originates in northern Europe centuries ago. One line of thought is that the shape of the flowers resemble the fingers of a glove and the botanist who first identified the plant was a Mr. Leonhart Fuchs in the sixteenth century in Germany. Over the years, Fuchs' glove morphed into Fox's glove and then Foxglove. (The plant and color fuchsia is linked to Leonhart as well.) Another line of thought starts with Welsh fairies…

foxglove

foxglove

foxglove

Our foxglove usually grow in open woodland where there is some moisture, partial sunlight, and highly acidic soil. Foxglove is a potent source of compounds that can be of medicinal value, are used in molecular biology, and can also kill you, but that gets us into subjects about which we know less than nothing. Just to be on the safe side though we strongly recommend that you not nibble on this particular plant. Our foxglove usually bloom from May through the summer.

Digoxigenin, derived from Digitalis pursuers, is used as a molecular probe to detect DNA.
We don't really understand any of that, but think that it is probably amazing.
For us, Foxglove is just another one of our beautiful flowers.